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Never been huge on the AW but today I 'found' one that looks like its been sitting a long while and, well, it looked good
Im contacting Monday to just get some info. Automatic, though, as well as one bigger dent right behind the door in pic


 

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'91 MR2 Turbo, '20 BRZ
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Very cool! Might be a good project if they have the title. Then you can play the "Ok let's just list what ISN'T broke" game on the MKI restoration. Seems everyday, due to sitting so long, I'm finding something that went bad or needs rebuilt!! (Pic below is where the 2nd MKI I'm working on, spent 7+ years...lol)
Car Plant Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting
 

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My '86 was $15k when I bought it new. That was in Berkeley, so maybe I paid high dollar.

So when does it become collectable? Just as soon as you collect one. ;)
Wish I could have bought a 2 in '85. Out of the ARMY in '86, married with 3 kids and school kinda makes a little 2 seater frivolous. Got my first MR2 when our youngesy was a few month into her 16th year. Only paid $1500 for that one. Paid more than that for our last washing machine.
 

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The only one's that I have seen locally for sale are turds, with high mileage and questionable histories/backgrounds.

I have noticed that used dealer's on both sides of the border are now importing JDM RHD MR2's from Japan, and selling them for big money online.

Unless you're willing to peel the onion and spend some $$$$, it's difficult to buy an MR2 these days.


AW11SC
 

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Wish I could have bought a 2 in '85. Out of the ARMY in '86, married with 3 kids and school kinda makes a little 2 seater frivolous. Got my first MR2 when our youngesy was a few month into her 16th year. Only paid $1500 for that one. Paid more than that for our last washing machine.
In 1986 I had just finished my degree and I had just moved out to Berkeley to start my first professional job. I strolled into Berkeley Toyota on a Sunday afternoon just to eyeball cars, and ended up driving away with the '86 MR2 that was hanging out on the lot. There was a salesman lurking in the shadows, and he had contacts who could finesse all of the paperwork. It was a marvel to see him in action. I had that car for 30 years and 300k miles. It died when the frame rusted out from the inside. I have an '04 spyder now.
 

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...I had that car for 30 years and 300k miles. It died when the frame rusted out from the inside....
IMO, this is one the biggest obstructions of why this car is struggling to become a collectible. They're disintegrating due to their delicate & flimsy thinner gauge body panels/frames mostly thanks to the 80s 'economy' construction mentality.

On the other hand, that's exactly what happened to my '69 Camaro RS/SS and yet, look at what a pristine example is worth now.
 

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Disintegrating? These cars are holding up a lot better than the '70s USDM cars. Like I said, a Vega, and not a Cosworth Vega either, will fetch a better price than an MR2. I do miss mine though. No power, no weight, no reliability, bad gearing and a suspension system that had no business on the road made a car that teaches people to drive right. I do entertain the thought of getting one to upgrade, but, naw, too many cars already.
 

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IMO, this is one the biggest obstructions of why this car is struggling to become a collectible. They're disintegrating due to their delicate & flimsy thinner gauge body panels/frames mostly thanks to the 80s 'economy' construction mentality.

On the other hand, that's exactly what happened to my '69 Camaro RS/SS and yet, look at what a pristine example is worth now.
WRONG !!

Toyota's at the time had thicker quality sheet metal with better corrosion protection than most. That's fact, not fiction. MR2's rust because their owner's never took care of them. Washing the salt of your car does wonders to prevent rust. Better yet, don't drive it in the winter, I never did.

The original quality of construction in the MR2 is excellent. At the time, it was praised industry wide for this. The problem is a majority of previous owner's, who for the most part seem to have neglected and abused the hell out of them.

My car has 100% zero rust...... I love using that oxymoron..... :love:


Minty AW11SC
 

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Facts are against you. Just measure the gauge of the body panels compared to an SW20, thinner. The same neglected SW20 survives, the AW11 doesn't.
 

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Wrong again.

I don't know about US car's, but Canada has Federal Laws protecting consumer's against rust car's which were passed in the early 1980's.

All manufacturer's in Canada have to sell all brand new vehicles with a factory warranty / guarantee against rust for 10 years.

And Toyota always had thicker sheet metal than all US domestic brands, starting from the early 1980's onwards. Not only that, Toyota always used a better quality of sheet metal .

Get your facts straight.


Minty AW11SC
 

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I think you need to buy a new guage.


MInty AW11SC
Did you measure them? Fair question, youre saying he's wrong, and he might be, but in my talking with Pete, he's meticulous and,well, anal. If he says that they're thicker on the SW then Im inclined to believe he measured or has evidence.
You cant just scream out 'WRONG' without evidence
 

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... They're disintegrating due to their delicate & flimsy thinner gauge body panels/frames mostly thanks to the 80s 'economy' construction mentality.
What I am talking about is not the panels, or the frame design, or vehicle maintenance. It might be about recycled steel. Recycled steel was tried in the body panels, and it was pulled immediately because of the disastrous results. New cars were showing rust while they were still on the dealer lots. It may have been kept on in the heavy frame components. This is a different kind of rust. It does not flake off, but rather chunks out. I had two '86 cars, and they both failed at exactly the same spot. The heavy frame rails that run through the sills disintegrated, and they did it right where the rear trailing arm mounted. The undercoating was still intact, but with no metal under it. I reached into the drainage hole and fished out chunks of slag the size of a pocket knife. Scary stuff, particularly since it would not have shown up in a simple visual inspection.

With 30 years on the cars, I cannot say that I did not get my money's worth, but I still felt badly about giving those cars up. The spyder made up for it, though. It is faster, with better and safer handling. Also, I had completely forgotten how cool a convertible is.
 

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^ That is new to me and frankly, a bit shocking if true. Thanks for the update. This could explain the thousands of rotted out AW11s for owners, even those that took care of them.

Would have never thought Toyota would stoop to that. But in hindsight, whenever anyone pins 'economy' on anything, they might tend to overdo it - and an MK1 was always billed as an economy sports car back in the day.
 

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Japanese Automotive Steel Maker Caught Lying About the Strength of Its Parts
All of the major Japanese automakers, in addition to GM and Ford, may be affected.



Earlier this week controversy arose from Japan as steel supplier, Kobe Steel, was caught "falsifying data about the strength and durability of some aluminum and copper products," reports Bloomberg. Not surprisingly, this has reportedly affected a large portion of automakers hailing from Japan as well as a couple of domestic brands that happen to use Kobe as a supplier.

Among Kobe Steel's client list are Toyota, Honda, Subaru, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Mazda, GM, and Ford. In other words, a majority of the cars roaming the streets today. Toyota states that misrepresented Kobe products have been used in car hoods, doors, and "peripheral areas."

"We are rapidly working to identify which vehicle models might be subject to this situation and what components were used. We recognize that this breach of compliance principles on the part of a supplier is a grave issue," said Toyota spokesman, Takashi Ogawa.

Meanwhile, Honda says that falsified metals have been used in its doors and hoods as well. Mazda has confirmed its use of Kobe aluminum but didn't specify where. Outside of the automotive industry, bogus Kobe products were reportedly found in planes, trains, and potentially a space rocket.

Dating back over a hundred years, Kobe Steel is Japan's third-largest steelmaker. According to a company spokesperson, the misrepresentation of quality figures was found to be systematic, present in all four of the company's plants, and started occurring as early as 10 years ago.

The exact impact of the steelmaker's indiscretions are still unclear, but Japanese securities analysts predict possible recalls, not unlike the faulty airbag situation with Takata. Takata filed for bankruptcy in June.


SOURCE: Japanese Automotive Steel Maker Caught Lying About the Strength of Its Parts


This article was published in October, 2017.



Minty AW11SC
 

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...Would have never thought Toyota would stoop to that...
Well, as I said, at 30 years you have to admit that you got your money's worth from the car. They may have figured that economy steel in the frame would exceed the lifespan of the car, and normally they would have been right. It is only sad because we like these cars and wish that they would last forever.

With the two '86 cars gone, I decided that I was done with the MK1 model. There were no more parts, and every repair became a crisis. With the spyder, I actually don't miss them. It is a major step up in both speed and handling. The power to mass ratio is comparable to the SC. The number that surprised me is that the spyder has the longest wheelbase of the MR2 series, even though it has the shortest overall length. That, along with the 3cm tire stagger, is probably what makes for the handling improvement. I don't mean to steal this thread or denigrate the MK1. I am just recounting my own journey.
 

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When I drove the MR-S, it was light-years better in refinement than the MK1 which is what it kept getting compared to. One of the best handling cars I've ever driven. I was about to get one when I started hearing stories of transmission woes and held off. Then what clinched the "No" side was the abysmal storage space, maybe a toothbrush is about it. It's a good 3rd car, I think - but not a daily as I planned it to be.

Agreed that getting 30 years out of a car that might have been made with shoddy steelwork is pretty good. But my SW20 is going on 32 and no rust.
 
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