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After seeing a Mk1 being redone on Wheeler Dealers (British buy/fix/resell show) I started to wonder how soon our Mk1s will start to take on the status of collectible?

I'm seeing less and less of the "how do I keep my rusting hulk running?" threads and more of practical rehabs being done. I know mine has been in the garage for a couple of years (motorcycle accident, but doing much better now) and I'm looking forward to restoring it to the point it will be worth something to someone 10 years from now.

I saw where Overhaulin' did a Lotus a while back and I'm seeing where some of the older (C5 or C6?) Corvettes only had a bit over 200 HP, so when will the rest of the world catch on that these are very interesting cars?

We had a car show downtown recently that had an 89 Porsche and numerous other Euro cars. I hope to have mine in there next year.
 

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NADA: in 2001 a 1986 MR2 books at $2,400 (assuming it was in nice shape)
NADA: in 2013 a 1986 MR2 books at $3,275 (average retail) to $4,275 (high retail)

MSRP was around $11,300 (in 1986 dollars). We're probably about 10 years away from seeing those kinds of numbers for nice restorations. Assuming gasoline is still legal. I think a lot of it depends on when those of us who grew up in the 80s remember the time with less embarassment (big hair, Huey Lewis, square cars, etc.) and more fondness. Um...I for one am probably about 10 years away from that.
 

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You know what else would help? If the Fast & Furious or James Bond franchises would incorporate one into their storyline.

Not sure if Vin Diesel or Dwayne Johnson would even fit in one, but I'm sure they could find some reason to have Jordana Brewster exploit it's comical size and freakish agility (if not blazing speed) to some highly entertaining effect. She rolls up in a MkI to whatever the new gathering place is, and Toretto just drones out, "You gotta be kidding me..."

Or maybe Mr. Bond needs to infiltrate some L.A. hoodlums and Q. outfits a MkI with a small block supercharged V8 all-wheel-drive with, I don't know, a frunk-mounted plasma cannon. Naturally, it would need to be submersible like the Lotus was. Q. introduces it with some line like, "As you so clearly demonstrate with your preference for the Baretta, size is of no consequence, 007."
 

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I have to agree with all the other posters on the relationship of dollar value to the level of profile in the popular media. If someone cool has one, or some big budget film highlights one, then the value will increase. Look at the dollars people get for late 60's Chargers every time a Dukes of Hazzard film comes out.

As long as it is just a small community of enthusiasts that wants these cars, the demand will be relatively low and the price will never be high no matter how rare. Maybe it's better this way by keeping the purchase price down and keeping speculators away.
 

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Mordakai said:
Oh so true!
Lol gasoline is going to be not only legal but heavily subsidized until the ground runs dry. We'll be fine
 

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Well... we do need oil for more than cars; it is used in plastics, aircraft fuel (don't think we'll be flying electric any time soon unless it's blimp time), pharmaceuticals and dozens of other uses you wouldn't immediately think about. What I expect is that electric will become cheaper than gas and battery issues will be solved. What this means is that enthusiasts will still be able to drive cars for another couple of generations, and will still be available for vintage cars many decades later. But people will choose electric over gas... probably within the next ten years.

We are also designing, right now, vacuum tube trains which will cut the travel time of a coast to coast trip down to less than an hour and cost maybe twenty bucks return. Prototypes are expected within 2-5 years but they'll be much slower - around 1000 mph. True vacuum trains will have speeds over 7,000 mph.

If you want to be concerned, start worrying about auto-drive cars... once they get going, how long before insurance (car and medical) force us to buy cars we can't actually drive ourselves?

But to seriously answer the question. There are way too many MR2's out there in daily use. Here in Phoenix there are at between 2 and 10 on sale at any time on Craigslist and car trader magazines. Until the numbers come down you simply can't have it as a collector's car. The Pontiac Fiero, royally thrashed my the MR2 up to its last year of production, is more of a collector's car. Why? Well most of them fell apart and were trashed long ago. I rarely see a Fiero on the road - I see MR2's every week here in Phoenix.

I also agree the MR2 has no visibility. In part WE need to change that, but adoption in a major film would be really, really helpful. To me, my MR2 was a classic the first day I drove it home back in 1985.
 

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There are three requirements that all need to be met for a car to become valuable. One, it has to be desirable, two, it needs to be old, three, it has to have been made in limited quantities. If it gets old enough, the limited quantities requirement will be over ridden. We are ON THE WAY!!
Bob('85 since new, now 20V)
 

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AlastairMR2 said:
We are also designing, right now, vacuum tube trains which will cut the travel time of a coast to coast trip down to less than an hour and cost maybe twenty bucks return. Prototypes are expected within 2-5 years but they'll be much slower - around 1000 mph. True vacuum trains will have speeds over 7,000 mph.
The derailment videos of those will be epic.
 

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AlastairMR2 said:
Well... we do need oil for more than cars; it is used in plastics, aircraft fuel (don't think we'll be flying electric any time soon unless it's blimp time), pharmaceuticals and dozens of other uses you wouldn't immediately think about. What I expect is that electric will become cheaper than gas and battery issues will be solved. What this means is that enthusiasts will still be able to drive cars for another couple of generations, and will still be available for vintage cars many decades later. But people will choose electric over gas... probably within the next ten years.

We are also designing, right now, vacuum tube trains which will cut the travel time of a coast to coast trip down to less than an hour and cost maybe twenty bucks return. Prototypes are expected within 2-5 years but they'll be much slower - around 1000 mph. True vacuum trains will have speeds over 7,000 mph.

If you want to be concerned, start worrying about auto-drive cars... once they get going, how long before insurance (car and medical) force us to buy cars we can't actually drive ourselves?

But to seriously answer the question. There are way too many MR2's out there in daily use. Here in Phoenix there are at between 2 and 10 on sale at any time on Craigslist and car trader magazines. Until the numbers come down you simply can't have it as a collector's car. The Pontiac Fiero, royally thrashed my the MR2 up to its last year of production, is more of a collector's car. Why? Well most of them fell apart and were trashed long ago. I rarely see a Fiero on the road - I see MR2's every week here in Phoenix.

I also agree the MR2 has no visibility. In part WE need to change that, but adoption in a major film would be really, really helpful. To me, my MR2 was a classic the first day I drove it home back in 1985.

battery's solved(just waiting on the gov to let the public have them), auto drive cars, google has over a million miles on there car already, with the new battery's they got, wind energy will take off and will be cleaner, hence the force of battery power cars only on the road(yes) and gas will no longer be needed its only a matter of time before hypo's are no longer needed!
 

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The can't derail. The tube itself is about 98% vacuum and the shape of the carriages and the skin surface will generate dynamic lift so the carriages are basically floating. The skin is the key and involves some very advanced aerodynamics. In the more advanced designs the train is passive and receives a periodic inertial boost around every 10 miles (current designs) from induction coils which also vamp up the internal supply for the carriages. In effect there really isn't a train - it is really just a series of carriages. On computer simulation we have reproduced earthquakes, catastrophic damage to the tube (including sabotage) and failure of the induction coils (to name but a few).
 

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We have simulated the 1000mph train extensively and have allowed for catastrophic loss of vacuum and subsonic transitions. To-date we can stop the train (in theory at least) within 22 miles using a passive breaking system built into the tube. Peak G force will 4.5G and avg. G force will be 2.1G. A huge amount of work remains to be done, but I expect eventually the system will be far and away the safest, cheapest form of transport. Believe it or not the first, crude prototype for this system was built back in around 1914!
 

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I just wanted to have a parade and you've rained all over it. That would truly be awesome if it makes it. I may have to ask my uncle (retired engineer for Union Pacific) if he's heard anything. However, I can't see something that technologically advanced being the cheapest form of transport. That would be a massive blow to the aviation industry and practically destroy my hometown's economy. Although I would happily pay the price to say I rode on a hypersonic train.
 

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AlastairMR2 said:
We have simulated the 1000mph train extensively and have allowed for catastrophic loss of vacuum and subsonic transitions. To-date we can stop the train (in theory at least) within 22 miles using a passive breaking system built into the tube. Peak G force will 4.5G and avg. G force will be 2.1G. A huge amount of work remains to be done, but I expect eventually the system will be far and away the safest, cheapest form of transport. Believe it or not the first, crude prototype for this system was built back in around 1914!

Doesn't .gov already got these?
 

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I want pneumatic transit tubes! Like at the bank, and Futurama! And one from frunk/cup holder/trunk for cold beverages!

The Ae86 are a ways ahead of us in collectability (gee thanks, initial D) but once you can't get a rusty sr5 for less than $5k, mk1s will be next. I am hording them now before the fanboys get them!
 

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Unfortunately, never. I don't think these cars will EVER have the 'collectable' following that cars that usually carry that moniker have.

We as current or previous MR2 owners will always have a soft spot for Toyota's little mid-engined coupe but we'll never see the prices that more 'popular' cars have reached.

Sure you might see a medium red pearl 89 SC with 5000 miles at Barrett-Jackson go for $10k... but that's going to be the extent of it!
 
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