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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1992 (mfd. 1991) MR2 T-Top 3S-GTE Turbo 5-speed -734/E153 185k Miles Car is only driven in city/highway, I've never tracked it.
Hey all, going to need to replace my clutch pretty soon. So far I've decided to not only replace the clutch and pressure plate with the Exedy OE Replacement but also:
  • OEM Toyota Release Bearing (as I've heard bad things about aftermarket bearings, so keeping it safe)
  • Possible flywheel resurfacing (unless anyone can recommend an aftermarket one for daily/street driving if any)
  • New Flywheel Bolts
  • Replacing Rear Main Seal and Rear Main Housing Seal
Now for the main seal housing, should I go with the horseshoe metal gasket OR will FIPG Toyota Packing 103 be safe to use?
Please, any tips or recommendations would help!
 

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OEM Bearing good
Do resurface the flywheel, unless you can get a new one for cheaper than the cost.
You don't need new bolts, they are not a torque to yield item. But if you want to get them, you can.
What does Toyota use? Metal or FIPG? For the seal housing to block, use the gasket, for the seal housing to sump, use FIPG.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OEM Bearing good
Do resurface the flywheel, unless you can get a new one for cheaper than the cost.
You don't need new bolts, they are not a torque to yield item. But if you want to get them, you can.
What does Toyota use? Metal or FIPG? For the seal housing to block, use the gasket, for the seal housing to sump, use FIPG.
I really appreciate the input!
 

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91 gen 4 swap, 00 stock until the K20 gets installed.
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I've been happy with my Fidanza flywheel if you are looking to upgrade. Don't forget to get lube for the clutch fork and input shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been happy with my Fidanza flywheel if you are looking to upgrade. Don't forget to get lube for the clutch fork and input shaft.
Yes, I'm currently reading my repair manuals on the lubricants for those components. Though, for the input shaft spline, can I use the same moly-lithium grease as well? Or is it a specific lube?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They specify a high melting point grease called Spline Grease so it doesn't get on the clutch disc surface. You don't need much anyway.
Although the repair manual says to apply a thin layer of grease on the splines, other owners say to avoid this. What should I do?
 

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Although the repair manual says to apply a thin layer of grease on the splines, other owners say to avoid this. What should I do?
The repair manual says to coat the other parts in Molybdenum Disulphide Lithium Based Grease or MP Grease but it states to apply Spline Grease to the input shaft spline.
As a trained Toyota mechanic using this document they would know exactly how much to put on. Like I said, the grease specified is designed for this application and the amount you apply would be very minimal. Owners who say to avoid it will have heard of stories about people applying too much of the wrong grease and it getting on the clutch assembly making it slip. If done correctly with the correctly specified grease, there will be no problems. Although going out to buy a whole tube of Spline Grease just for one clutch might be excessive. However it doesn't look too expensive if you can get some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The repair manual says to coat the other parts in Molybdenum Disulphide Lithium Based Grease or MP Grease but it states to apply Spline Grease to the input shaft spline.
As a trained Toyota mechanic using this document they would know exactly how much to put on. Like I said, the grease specified is designed for this application and the amount you apply would be very minimal. Owners who say to avoid it will have heard of stories about people applying too much of the wrong grease and it getting on the clutch assembly making it slip. If done correctly with the correctly specified grease, there will be no problems. Although going out to buy a whole tube of Spline Grease just for one clutch might be excessive. However it doesn't look too expensive if you can get some.
Yeah I figured that was the case with other owners. I didn't see a problem with a thin amount but I wanted to be sure. I don't mind buying the spline grease for this one job yet I appreciate the links and I'll extend my research on that! Thanks a bunch GDII :)
 

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Your discussion starter mentioned the Exedy OE Replacement which happens to be a pretty good clutch. You can purchase a clutch kit from Exedy that is a great and reliable street driver which include the pressure plate, throwout bearing, clutch, alignment tool, and spline grease. A reliable seller on the East Coast stocks these. One source: Exedy OEM Clutch Kit - MR2

Have your flywheel resurfaced by a local machine shop. Use the retention/clip (that comes with the Exedy kit for the throwout bearing) and make sure you apply the spline grease to the spline and use a molybdenum disulphide lithium base at places shown on page CL-18 of the BGB (see attachment). Nothing is bad about the Exedy throw out bearing-ok? Also you don't need to get new clutch plate bolts or flywheel bolts for street driving unless you see visual signs of damage. Finally, I would recommend you replace your rear seal of your engine if you are having any engine oil leakage. When you remove the flywheel bolts from the engine crankshaft and if you see there is oil on the base of the flywheel bolts this is one indication of a leaky rear seal. Another is obvious-leakage on the ground where you park and oil inside the transaxle bell housing. But while they (or you) have the transaxle out its a great time to replace the rear engine seal. Then of course replace the transaxle seals where the axles go into the transaxle housing. There are two of them. Bob Pham does an install of these axle housing seals using an PVC plumbing plastic if you don't have the correct tool. Some might not agree of Bob's technique but worked very well for me.
His video is at:

I've done this job with the Exedy kit both on the OEM steel flywheel and the lightweight aluminum Fidanza with good results. The Fidanza is a very nice upgrade (but a tad more expensive) but not necessary for a street application. More info on the Fidanza:

Of course there are many other options depending on your needs and wants. Good luck!
 

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