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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I've had a leak from the driver's side hard line that runs above the fuel tank. Since discovering it, I capped off the two lines and circulated the in-out lines on the motor. I now have the fuel tank out and want to definitively fix this. It is leaking where they always tend to leak - right at the bend/bracket.

The part is no longer available from Toyota (the pass side is). I've read through some old threads and want to see what is the best fix. I don't mind spending some money to have it done right.


1.) Used part - eh I think it will just fail again.
2.) I've read of people trying to braze/repair the hard line with seemingly mixed results. If going this route, I'd be happy to take is somewhere, but if this was a durable repair.
3.) Cutting out the bad section and replacing it with heater hose and clamps. If this route - is there some special type of high quality heater hose that will last a LONG time? Silicone? Also - should the cut ends of the pipe be beaded or rolled/flared etc. so as to minimize potential leaks?
4.) Is there another option? A custom/replicated pipe? I wouldn't mind going to a fabricator or hose/pipe place and see. This is probably the most expensive and less likely to happen in reasonable time frame option.


I'm leaning towards option 3 but want to make sure this is a durable 'life-long' (as best as possible) repair. Pulling the tank is a pain, so I want to avoid having to do this again! I did read about @Alex W 's work around method, but keeping the factory routing is okay for me at the moment.
 

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91 gen 4 swap, 00 stock until the K20 gets installed.
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I did option 3. I "Flared" the ends by forcing a socket into the tube and twisting it to make the pipe wider and then used standard heater hose and clamps. It's been holding up fine for 4 years now. Some people simply replace the whole line with heater hose. You could also weld a fitting onto the coolant line headed to the radiator and use the good heater line as the return. That's how the Spyder and NSX handle coolant to the heater core.
 

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I did option 3 as well. I hammered in a tapered swaging tool and then a socket to make it round and smoothed the edges. Applied rubbing alcohol to the surfaces as the rubber hose is slid on. This will seal the surfaces like a factory connection. Use a spring clamp to avoid distorting the tubing.
 

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I also had issues with these lines getting crushed getting the hoses off. I ended up making a die out of mcmaster parts and turning down a piece of round stock. So far so good.
 

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I did option 3. I "Flared" the ends by forcing a socket into the tube and twisting it to make the pipe wider and then used standard heater hose and clamps. It's been holding up fine for 4 years now. Some people simply replace the whole line with heater hose. You could also weld a fitting onto the coolant line headed to the radiator and use the good heater line as the return. That's how the Spyder and NSX handle coolant to the heater core.
An easy way to bead a tube is to grind a vise grip so it indents the end as you clamp it. Then just walk it around, clamping the tube over and over to get a bead.

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You just need enough clearance for one side of the jaws to slide in, which shouldn't be that hard.

A welder to put a nice rounded profile on the other end would help, but you could probably get a similar result with careful grinding.



I do like the idea of tapping off the feed line for the radiator close to the heatercore, then running one dedicated return back. It would simplify plumbing everywhere. That said, it sounds like one of those projects that is simple on the surface, but would easily take up 4-6 hrs of fussing with it.
 

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Now that I really like. I'm going to have to make one of those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone!

Some follow up questions:

1.) Is there a 'best' type of heater hose? Silicone?

2.) I really want to bead the end. I looked up beaders and they come in a few flavors: industrial ($$$$), handheld ($150-200+). A bit much for a one time use thing. I saw this thing: https://www.amazon.com/Earls-Performance-5-5167R-008ERL-EZ-Beader/dp/B000A8OTVI which is neat but seems to have marginal at best reviews.

@DefSport I like that idea. Do you have something like that handy?? I can come pick it up! Would save me having to make one!

I also called a few hose places over the weekend to see if they can bead it for me... but that would require bringing in the whole thing rather than doing it in-situ.
 

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I haven’t needed to bead any tubing in situ, so no, I don’t have a beading tool. I usually weld a bead around the end to get the same effect.

It wouldn’t be hard to do with a grinder tho. If you need a zap or two with a MIG I can help you out no problem.
 

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Hi all

I've had a leak from the driver's side hard line that runs above the fuel tank. Since discovering it, I capped off the two lines and circulated the in-out lines on the motor. I now have the fuel tank out and want to definitively fix this. It is leaking where they always tend to leak - right at the bend/bracket.

The part is no longer available from Toyota (the pass side is). I've read through some old threads and want to see what is the best fix. I don't mind spending some money to have it done right.


1.) Used part - eh I think it will just fail again.
2.) I've read of people trying to braze/repair the hard line with seemingly mixed results. If going this route, I'd be happy to take is somewhere, but if this was a durable repair.
3.) Cutting out the bad section and replacing it with heater hose and clamps. If this route - is there some special type of high quality heater hose that will last a LONG time? Silicone? Also - should the cut ends of the pipe be beaded or rolled/flared etc. so as to minimize potential leaks?
4.) Is there another option? A custom/replicated pipe? I wouldn't mind going to a fabricator or hose/pipe place and see. This is probably the most expensive and less likely to happen in reasonable time frame option.


I'm leaning towards option 3 but want to make sure this is a durable 'life-long' (as best as possible) repair. Pulling the tank is a pain, so I want to avoid having to do this again! I did read about @Alex W 's work around method, but keeping the factory routing is okay for me at the moment.
I literally dealt with this very situation just last week. I took mine to a local radiator repair shop and the guy there was able to braze it at that exact spot. He tested it for leaks and I installed it as well as the fuel tank. If it's at all possible, I would recommend going to someone with any brazing skill to get it repaired. Way cheaper than a replacement and definitely cheaper than a custom one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I literally dealt with this very situation just last week. I took mine to a local radiator repair shop and the guy there was able to braze it at that exact spot. He tested it for leaks and I installed it as well as the fuel tank. If it's at all possible, I would recommend going to someone with any brazing skill to get it repaired. Way cheaper than a replacement and definitely cheaper than a custom one.
I definitely have thought about this. I read through some older threads that mentioned this type of repair that later failed. It is unclear though how skilled or how good the repair job was. I'd have to look back at the pipes and see if there is a way to put in some type of 'strain relief' at the bracket so it doesn't fail at the same area again.
 

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I definitely have thought about this. I read through some older threads that mentioned this type of repair that later failed. It is unclear though how skilled or how good the repair job was. I'd have to look back at the pipes and see if there is a way to put in some type of 'strain relief' at the bracket so it doesn't fail at the same area again.
Yeah it does depend on the person who does it. I’ve taken all kinds of stuff to this guy and nothing has failed.
 

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I cut out the top bend with the bracket and used a silicon bent hose to replace it. No issues after a lot of miles. I used crush clamps and I didn't flare it as access was so terrible and I didn't want to drop the whole hardlines.
 

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I cut out my damaged bracket and added in a small section of rubber hose, Did my best to flare the ends of each side. 10 years later, no leaks.

However knowing what I know now I would probably have got it fixed up with the welding method.
 

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This is what I did. I had the engine in. The hose was very tight fitting I needed some dishwasher liquid to even get it on. Both hardline ends had at least 1" cover with the silicon hose. I don't think I even needed the crush clamps. I did this March 2020.

I read several threads here on the welding often failing. It has to be brazed but the pipe is very thin it is prone to failure.

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