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I am installing my new flywheel and ARP flywheel bolts and the insturctions for the ARP bolts say to put some moly lube on them before installing. I went to 5 different parts stores and none of them had any of them. None of them even knew what moly lube was. They all thought I meant anti-seize. My question is can I go without putting moly lube on the bolts or should I just order some from summit and wait the few days it takes to get here?
 

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RIP 8/6/1948 - 9/5/2011
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I use my own concoction of "gorilla snot". It's moly lube cut with about 10% white lithium grease and 20% 20w/50 Castrol GTX. ;)
 

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If you go on ARPs website you can find the recomended torque for using motor oil. It is higher than if you use moly. That or do what alot of people do and use red loctite on the threads, under the heads of the bolts and a little on the crank flange.
 

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Yup, in fact the ZZ series motors have special Toyota red loctite already applied to them.

red loctite always on the FW bolts.
 

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you should be less worried about bolts coming undone, and more worried about material failures.

the reason you use lube is because youre threading into a blind hole. you cant get at the end of the bolt because its in the hole, and this means that you cant measure bolt stretch. bolt stretch is the only 100% accurate way to know that a bolt has been tightened to the correct yield point. a bolt is strongest when it is tightened so that it is in tension right upto its yield point, if done correctly it also wont come undone. torque wrenches arent accurate enough to find this point perfectly, even a really good one might only get within 10%. friction on the threads adds to the inaccuracy even further, hence using moly grease.

using loctite is all well and good, youll stop the bolts from coming undone. but the bolts wont exhibit the full potential of their strength as they almost certainly wont be torqued correctly. if ARP say to use moly grease then use moly grease, they know a lot more than anyone posting in this thread about fasteners in critical applications, they dont make the best engine fasteners on the market without knowing a thing or 2 about how they work. its an area id be inclined not to screw with unless you know exactly what youre doing, follow the instructions IMO :)

there is of course the fact that ARP fasteners are probably stronger than 99.9% of the applications they are used in will ever require. so you might never exert enough force to make them fail if installed in the ways some people have described above. but id rather not take the chance, a flywheel in a transverse engine spinning TOWARDS the cabin in forward drive is about the most dangerous thing on the car, apart from the driver of course lol
 

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Also ARP has a great tech line. Call them and ask. I believe they have a torque number for any lubricant you may choose, be it moly, engine oil, snot or loctite. This should be stickied for the number of times threads have come up asking questions about torquing ARP fasteners. ARP Technical Support: 800.826.3045 or 805.339.2200
 

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had a thought after i posted this yesterday as well, that if people are concerned with a bolt backing out and flying through the car maiming people on the way, lockwire would prevent this. it wont stop a bolt from loosening, but lockwiring the bolts together would stop one from ever coming out. it could only ever loosen off by a fraction of a turn,and youd just have to hope you notice the problem before the vibrations become enough to cause a stress failure. if the bolts are tightened properly then that would never happen though

if ARP provide torque settings for using loctite though then that makes things a bit safer. i doubt that any road car engine would ever push the fasteners hard enough to cause a failure, even if they arent installed to the correct torque (within reason), but theres no excuse really not to do things "by the book" from the outset. over engineering something is far better than under engineering something. especially when an 8000rpm 10lb cutting disc is involved ;)
 

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RIP 8/6/1948 - 9/5/2011
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Simple - and safe - solution . . . install a scatter blanket.
 

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Trim Adhesive is my favorite threadlocker, it works like a charm in high vibration applications, Had some locktited bellhousing bolts back out on my wife's car (600HP '72 Mustang Mach 1) broke all kinds of stuff, Converter $800 Front Trans Pump $90 (used) Flexplate $95 (SFI) Pump Busihing $50 Available only as a reseal kit. You get the idea. Besides if the Top Fuel guys use it, it has to work.
 

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Jim2109 said:
had a thought after i posted this yesterday as well, that if people are concerned with a bolt backing out and flying through the car maiming people on the way, lockwire would prevent this. it wont stop a bolt from loosening, but lockwiring the bolts together would stop one from ever coming out. it could only ever loosen off by a fraction of a turn,and youd just have to hope you notice the problem before the vibrations become enough to cause a stress failure. if the bolts are tightened properly then that would never happen though

if ARP provide torque settings for using loctite though then that makes things a bit safer. i doubt that any road car engine would ever push the fasteners hard enough to cause a failure, even if they arent installed to the correct torque (within reason), but theres no excuse really not to do things "by the book" from the outset. over engineering something is far better than under engineering something. especially when an 8000rpm 10lb cutting disc is involved ;)
Read up on proper lock wire use, it will prevent loosening.

And you would be surprised how much more load a properly torque fastener will take.
 
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