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This is why you really need to make a check list and make certain that you use top notch parts on a car that will be tracked. Cheesing out and using parts that work great on the street will almost always fail on a real track.
He used nylon hose for an oil temp or pressure feed. This quickly melted and the oil caught fire. I think he was on one of his first laps of the day.

not pretty.


image by Toronto Photo Guy
http://torontophotographer.blogspot.com/
 

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Ontario's first MK1.5,'05
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ya another 4agte, that was like lap 1 or 2. He left a big oil slick around that corner. I know he did get it up and running on the next day when at home but still very scary.....

On the bright side i have noticed that 1.5's have been holding up and doing rather well at tracks all over the place when it comes to getting to and from the track under their own power.



Martin
 

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I don't know why they even bother to package that nylon line with mechanical oil pressure gauges. Talk about an accident waiting to happen!
 

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It was actually the second or third lap.
Nolat go really lucky, and they didn't burn up much more then the shifter cables.
 

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WOOO awesome picture! There we go.

I still cant believe we did that nylon line. Hey, she's all fixed now anyways.

That was going on the 3rd lap. Later found out we had a MASSIVE crack in the header too. I dont know if it happened that friday or on sunday when we fixed it and raced at auto-x.

We installed a new fire wall, re welded and installed a bar on the manifold to brace it. It ate up our clutch line, some electronics and our shifter cables. All our other oil lines had mylar covered kevlar for heat protection. Even after the fire, the lines had NO damage. The covering however, was a little damaged.

I guess I should list what it had:

Oil lines are heat resistant hydraulic lines, crimped ends. They were covered with mylar covered kevlar sleeves.
Moroso oil filter relocate on the block, to permacool relocate where the battery was.
Thermotec turbo wrap over the Z31 turbocharger's turbine side.
The remaining wrap was put around our intake piping (which was plastic and was under direct flame with NO damage)
The header was heat wrapped as was the dump pipe.
and a 7 dollar princess auto oil pressure gauge with nylon line.

Yeah, guess what failed?

Since then, the firewall was replaced with a thermotec 3000 degree kevlar-mylar mat, the header has been re-welded and braced. Used titanium header wrap, did not wrap the turbine. Then we sealed it with the heat treat paint
Also installed an 8" Derale fan on the vented part of the engine cover.

It was so hot that the side fan wanted to turn on (thats where my air filter was). I also was un able to put my had between the firewall and the head because of the heat. Now its cool. I left it idling for an hour, the fan never turned on and it was cool.

Sounds like shes fixed.

Oh no oil pressure gauge too. Eventually, Im going electric.
 

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Also, the other note to be learned from this car fire:

Flames came into the cabin, up the rear wall preventing them from getting at the fire extinguisher mounted at the base of the rear window... The same place that I have mine mounted.
 

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ArmandoP said:
ok, Im glad I saw this as I ran nylon line to my dash pressure gauge and didn't even think about it. what should I be using?

Steel braided teflon line with threaded fittings. A good brand like Earls, Goodridge, Aeroquip or Russel.
 

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Anyone who's messed with anything in the engine bay should have a fire extinguisher in the cabin, period. You trust Toyota because they are deathly afraid of your lawyer, but you can't sue yourself. If you care about keeping your investment in your car, you should make sure you can put out an oil fire on a moment's notice in the middle of nowhere.
 

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I have to take most of the blame for this fire. I did (and still do) a lot of the work on this (Nolat's) car which is a team effort between Nolat, me and another friend in which we all help pay for, build and race the car.

To this day I kick myself that I never even thought of the nylon tube as being a weak point. We had never done this type of event with the car before and I guess in a way we didn't fully realize the level of demand on equipment. In autocross, where you run hard for about a minute then let the car sit for a half hour, it probably would have been fine and maybe even lasted the entire rest of the season. But on a track like this running hard for long periods of time, she got REALLY hot and stuff melted. Cheap stuff melted that shouldn't have even been on the car. There may have been another contributor to the fire, which as Nolat mentioned was the cracked manifold. It was not cracked when we wrapped and installed it, however, we did notice once we had it running again the day after the fire, we could hear an exhaust leak near the manifold. We do not know for sure if it was cracked by the time we got it to shannonville, but it could have been a partial cause of the fire, which none of us knew about at the time.

On a side note, the parts we did take the time to protect (oils lines etc...) were totally fine after being subjected to direct flames and crazy hot temperatures for at least 30 seconds or more!!!

Anyways, I've learned my lesson. I hope others learn from it as well. We got VERY lucky, nobody was hurt. The car is totally fine and, if anything, running better than ever. Everything is fixed and we will try hard to make sure nothing is overlooked again. It was a huge eye opener for me. Safety will be number 1 on our list from now on.


Great pic btw! Scary seeing myself in the passenger seat! :eek:


You live, you learn...sometimes the hard way.
 

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Discussion Starter #15

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Bill Strong said:
Good Post guys.
I am going to sticky this.

I would recommend Earls UltraFlex 650 Stainless lines and hose ends. Big bucks, but for your oil lines, not much is better. Good to 510F (265C)
http://www.holley.com/types/Ultra Flex 650 Hose - Stainless Braid.asp
Thanks for the suggestion. Will definitely keep those in mind for the future.

Considering the oil lines we are running were in direct flame and survived with zero damage (only had to replace 1 piece of shielding which was only slightly damaged) we have a lot of confidence in them and the shielding we used.
 

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I am the third driver for that car, and its interesting to note when we took the turbo off the car and unwrapped the heat wrap on the exhaust side (we originally had both sides wrapped) the steel had gone all rainbow coloured on us. Seems ok but it must have got SERIOUSLY hot, hence the meltage/fire happening under the back.
 

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Well,

If this is going to be a sticky, I'll add the pictures to the story.


The engine bay after the fire. Yellow fire extinguisher dry chemical all over it.

My fire extinguisher between the seats (where most people's tape storage is) saw some flamage throught the shifter cable hole.

A picture of the center console... Note the pass seat also got a bit burned (sorry Mike ;) ).
 

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The culprit.

Always in high spirits.

The free CAA tow home. CAA rocks. 200km tow.

The next day, early start. My coil wires (EDIS coil) which sat beside where the stock battery location is were burnt.

Some of the ugly damage...
 

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More damage ... facing the firewall.

A better view of the damage in the center console.

Fire damage to the plastic.

Shifter cables were siezed. You can see where the fire worked its magic on them.

Wideband O2 sensor wiring... no damage to controller or sensor.
 
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