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I'm getting ready to mate my e153 to a 2gr. With one hole needing to be threaded; What's everyone's opinion on helicoil vs time sert.

Also please confirm the size required. I believe it's m12 x 1.25. However is there a depth measurement as well?
 

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I'm getting ready to mate my e153 to a 2gr. With one hole needing to be threaded; What's everyone's opinion on helicoil vs time sert.

Also please confirm the size required. I believe it's m12 x 1.25. However is there a depth measurement as well?
I used a helicoil. M12x1.25 is correct. Use the same depth measurement as the other M12x1.25 mounting holes on the block. Mark off the drill bit with a piece of tape.
 

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Timeserts are probably stronger. But Helicoils are more than strong enough.
 

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I had never done a Timesert or Helicoil before and ended up going the Timesert route. Was really easy for a noob if that helps your decision at all.
 

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For my E53 I didn't have to use either. The only blank (untapped) hole in the block that lined up with a hole in the tranny was on the upper right (as you look at the block). I was able to use an MR2 Spyder front strut bolt (M14x1.5 IIRC), after drilling the hole a little larger and tapping to that thread / pitch. Perfect length; worked great.

Maybe the E53 bellhousing is different from the MK2's E153?

Jim
 

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For my E53 I didn't have to use either. The only blank (untapped) hole in the block that lined up with a hole in the tranny was on the upper right (as you look at the block). I was able to use an MR2 Spyder front strut bolt (M14x1.5 IIRC), after drilling the hole a little larger and tapping to that thread / pitch. Perfect length; worked great.

Maybe the E53 bellhousing is different from the MK2's E153?

Jim
That's the one I had to put the timesert in. You COULD tap it but the threads were just too shallow- no way it would give you a solid hold even though the bolt did thread in there. So timesert/helicoil or you could go with one size bigger bolt I suppose. Just easier and better to do the timesert/helicoil.

*EDIT* My motor came from a 2012 Highlander
 

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And mine was from a 2008 Highlander, which I thought was pretty much a clone of the RX350 underneath...
 

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My 2012 Rav4 motor had the hole (plain, no threads), but it was too large to tap for an M12 so I had to helicoil it.
 

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Where I work, we build up jet engines for various wide body airplanes.
The major accessories for power generation have helicoils in them. When properly installed, there is nothing wrong with them.
 

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Helicoils are good, and their primary advantage is that by each thread being moveable compared to the other, it can shift and load up the threads in the parent material much better. It actually loads up aluminum parent material threads BETTER than an equivalent sized bolt to the helicoil thread. So you'll get more tension pullout capability with the helicoil (usually doesn't matter, but it's an interesting difference between them).

A timesert works well too, but I'll say that the high vibration form of a timesert, a keensert, makes way more sense if you're going to have a solid insert. A keensert has 4 stakes that are driven in once you've gotten the insert to the proper install depth, and won't ever really come out. The major downside to a keensert is removing it means you destroy the threads, and have to go up to the next size keensert (they have a standard duty and heavy duty size for each internal thread size for this reason, so you get 1 repair with them).

Keenserts are more common in really high vibe environments like a rocket, but helicoils are still found in some places.
 
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