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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

I am looking for a Gen 3 3SGE O2 sensor. I know that bosch makes one for the 3SGTE but I am looking for one that will work on my N/A 3SGE. Also it?s a 4 wire sensor. What are the differences between the two and what are the part numbers if I can get from Toyota.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess you did not read my post. I don?t want to go with the universal one BoostedPenGuin, because it?s made for the turbo 3SGTE. Also I am not sure of the part number, does anyone with a 3SGE or comparable NA that makes around the same power know of any good 4 wire 02's
 

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don?t want to go with the universal one BoostedPenGuin, because it?s made for the turbo 3SGTE
i dont think you're reading the product description man ;) its universal. universal items arent made for anything, hense the universal part :) they splice in to any car with the appropriate receiving side.

if yours threads in, buy a universal thread in type.. if its flanged, buy a universal flanged type.

the actual O2 sensor itself is extremely generic. theres 2 types, but for all intensive purposes focus on one (the 2nd type is hard to find anyways! and $$$$$)..

the o2 sensor measures oxygen in the exhaust and creates a voltage by chemical reation corresponding in intesity to the available oxygen. thats how they ALL work...

factory o2 sensors work the same way, but are calibrated by wire length.. if you cut open your o2 sensor wiring you'll notice that its a silvery shiney special wire with a certain resistance (which is why you dont solder or butt-crimp o2's!). ideally, using a "universal" o2 sensor WILL give an inaccurate reading..

realistically, the difference between a factory o2 and a quality o2 sensor is marginal at best... as long as it fits into your exhaust, has the right amount of wires, and isnt bosch, it'll work...
 

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In his defense it doesn't say anywhere in your post that you don't want to use a universal. But if you really want the proper one maybe you should visit the UK mr2 boards and ask them for the part number because they were the ones that got the 3sge's in the NA mr2's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Listen?

I don?t want to use a bosch Universal O2 because of its design. It was made primarily for the 3SGTE and tested on the 3SGTE by bosch. From what I have seen it does not read accurately and it?s just a bad quality O2. I DON?T WANT TO USE IT! No disrespect at all TomsMR2 or anyone on here but I understand how O2?s work. My intension is not to come on here and argue with anyone. It?s just to find a 4 wire O2 that was designed to work on a N/A (3SGE) with the proper voltage range for my ECU!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
FYI: How does an O2 sensor work? (This Is For Those Who Dont Know!)

An Oxygen sensor is a chemical generator. It is constantly making a comparison between the Oxygen inside the exhaust manifold and air outside the engine. If this comparison shows little or no Oxygen in the exhaust manifold, a voltage is generated. The output of the sensor is sually between 0 and 1.1 volts. All spark combustion engines need the proper air fuel ratio to operate correctly. For gasoline this is 14.7 parts of air to one part of fuel. When the engine has more fuel than needed, all available Oxygen is consumed in the cylinder and gasses leaving through the exhaust contain almost no Oxygen. This sends out a voltage greater than 0.45 volts. If the engine is running lean, all fuel is burned, and the extra Oxygen leaves the cylinder and flows into the exhaust. In this case, the sensor voltage goes lower than 0.45 volts. Usually the output range seen seen is 0.2 to 0.7 volts.

The sensor does not begin to generate it's full output until it reaches about 600 degrees F. Prior to this time the sensor is not conductive. It is as if the circuit between the sensor and computer is not complete. The mid point is about 0.45 volts. This is neither rich nor lean. A fully warm O2 sensor *will not spend any time at 0.45 volts*. In many cars, the computer sends out a bias voltage of 0.45 through the O2 sensor wire. If the sensor is not warm, or if the circuit is not complete, the computer picks up a steady 0.45 volts. Since the computer knows this is an "illegal" value, it judges the sensor to not be ready. It remains in open loop operation, and uses all sensors except the O2 to determine fuel delivery. Any time an engine is operated in open loop, it runs somewhat rich and makes more exhaust emissions. This translates into lost power, poor fuel economy and air pollution.

The O2 sensor is constantly in a state of transition between high and low voltage. Manfucturers call this crossing of the 0.45 volt mark O2 cross counts. The higher the number of O2 cross counts, the better the sensor and other parts of the computer control system are working. It is important to remember that the O2 sensor is comparing the amount of Oxygen inside and outside the engine. If the outside of the sensor should become blocked, or coated with oil, sound insulation, undercoating or antifreeze, (among other things), this comparison is not possible.
 

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eazy2001x said:
FYI: How does an O2 sensor work? (This Is For Those Who Dont Know!)

An Oxygen sensor is a chemical generator. It is constantly making a comparison between the Oxygen inside the exhaust manifold and air outside the engine. If this comparison shows little or no Oxygen in the exhaust manifold, a voltage is generated. The output of the sensor is sually between 0 and 1.1 volts. All spark combustion engines need the proper air fuel ratio to operate correctly. For gasoline this is 14.7 parts of air to one part of fuel. When the engine has more fuel than needed, all available Oxygen is consumed in the cylinder and gasses leaving through the exhaust contain almost no Oxygen. This sends out a voltage greater than 0.45 volts. If the engine is running lean, all fuel is burned, and the extra Oxygen leaves the cylinder and flows into the exhaust. In this case, the sensor voltage goes lower than 0.45 volts. Usually the output range seen seen is 0.2 to 0.7 volts.

The sensor does not begin to generate it's full output until it reaches about 600 degrees F. Prior to this time the sensor is not conductive. It is as if the circuit between the sensor and computer is not complete. The mid point is about 0.45 volts. This is neither rich nor lean. A fully warm O2 sensor *will not spend any time at 0.45 volts*. In many cars, the computer sends out a bias voltage of 0.45 through the O2 sensor wire. If the sensor is not warm, or if the circuit is not complete, the computer picks up a steady 0.45 volts. Since the computer knows this is an "illegal" value, it judges the sensor to not be ready. It remains in open loop operation, and uses all sensors except the O2 to determine fuel delivery. Any time an engine is operated in open loop, it runs somewhat rich and makes more exhaust emissions. This translates into lost power, poor fuel economy and air pollution.

The O2 sensor is constantly in a state of transition between high and low voltage. Manfucturers call this crossing of the 0.45 volt mark O2 cross counts. The higher the number of O2 cross counts, the better the sensor and other parts of the computer control system are working. It is important to remember that the O2 sensor is comparing the amount of Oxygen inside and outside the engine. If the outside of the sensor should become blocked, or coated with oil, sound insulation, undercoating or antifreeze, (among other things), this comparison is not possible.
^Anyone can go to google and find that information and click copy and paste.

eazy2001x said:
Listen?
I don?t want to use a bosch Universal O2 because of its design. It was made primarily for the 3SGTE and tested on the 3SGTE by bosch. From what I have seen it does not read accurately and it?s just a bad quality O2. I DON?T WANT TO USE IT! No disrespect at all TomsMR2 or anyone on here but I understand how O2?s work. My intension is not to come on here and argue with anyone. It?s just to find a 4 wire O2 that was designed to work on a N/A (3SGE) with the proper voltage range for my ECU!
You asked for our help and we gave you an answer if you don't like
it then DO NOT post here. We are here to help not argue over kiddie ____ all day. Hope you find what you are looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I guess again you miss my point. So let me ask you it like this... what?s the operational voltage of a 3sge O2 verses a 3SGTE one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks,

i i guess i will have to get it from toyota for a 94+ 3sgte then..
 
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