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Discussion Starter #1
so i just got a set of megan rear control arms, and you can adjust the length which alters the anti-squat characteristics of the suspension. how does anti-squat affect handling? and does the change in wheelbase affect handling? the front tension rods also adjust caster and the by doing so can also affect the wheelbase... would these changes have much if any affect on handling?

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #2
would the anti-squat allow you to run less static camber in the rear because of less wheel travel caused by the weight transfer?

Matt
 

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Sorry, I haven't had a good chance to put together a good reply for this. The other problem is that anti squat is something I don't really have much experience with, or really a good feel for the effects of. I can take a stab at it however.

So anti-anything (squat, dive, roll... people don't talk about anti-roll much, but it works basically the same) is basically a measure of the split between loads transfered through the springs and load transfered through the suspension members. Too much of any is a bad thing as it has the effect of locking up the suspension, making it less compliant over bumps = loss of traction.

I am more familiar with anti-dive so I will talk about that a little first. if you have very good camber curves thats good for cornering, keep the wheel right where you want it during body roll. However, camber is always a trade off. A really good camber curve in roll means that you gain a lot of camber as the suspension compresses. However that also means that if you compress the suspension evenly on both sides you still gain a bunch of camber, but the chassis isn't rolling. So you end up losing contact patch and sacrificing braking. Anti-dive helps limit that movement during braking.

I suppose anti-squat would work pretty much the same, keep you from moving too far out of the camber sweet spot during a launch / acceleration. However, I also remember reading at some point that the 300ZXTT is a poor drag racer because of the amount of anti-squat built into the rear suspension, making it not launch as well. However it is also supposed to be a good road course car, so maybe its only a disadvantage in drag racing. I think I have even heard of muscle cars running pro-squat to improve traction. That would be with a solid axle however, where camber curves are non-existent.

As far as your adjustable strut rods, I'm not really sure how much effect on anti-squat you are going to get by adjusting the length. The only real effect is going to be by changing the angle of the strut (caster if you will, although that term doesn't really apply to a non-steered wheel). If you brought the wheel as far forward as possible that should increase anti-squat, move it as far rearward as possible should decrease it. I don't know if you will be able to get a noticeably difference either way, but it may be worth playing with.

I think the wheel base effects would be small enough to not worry about, compared to the other effects we are talking about they should be minor.
 

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when it comes to drag racing a solid axle car, anti squat is a good thing. Drag cars of this type typically have over 100% and as much as 200%. Watch a drag car leave the line and you'll notice that a properly setup car will either stay level in the rear or even lift the rear of the body up when it takes off. Every action has an equal and opposite, right? So when the rear lifts, it's actually pushing the tires downward. Think about squatting on a scale and then standing up.
I've also heard the same thing about 300zx's. It just doesn't make sense to me. I would think that a very soft rear spring and light front strut rebound would let the body transfer weight and then a lot of anti-squat would help dig the tires in once the wheels start to drive forward.
 
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