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Discussion Starter #1
I installed the rear earl's SS brake lines this weekend, but they look a bit odd.
I think the spring is throwing me off. Just curious if this looks right.



Does anyone know what the spring is used for exactly?
this is the only way that really worked for the install.
 

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Master of Twos R Us
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Goodridge lines also don't have anything like that...that looks really odd.
 

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Shadetree mechanic
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This is from the Russell website FAQ:

In order to pass the Department of Transportation standard MVSS-106 requirements, brake lines are subjected to what is called a "whip test", where the brakeline is literally whipped back and forth for a specified period of time. When subjected to this abnormal abuse, our Cycleflex lines may begin to fray where the braided stainless steel jacket meets the crimp-on fitting. In order to pass this test, Russell engineers have incorporated a Teflon? sleeve along with the crimp-on fitting that distributes the loads of this test over a broader section of hose, thereby preventing the stainless steel braid from fraying. Other than this Teflon? sleeve and DOT markings on the hose itself, the pressure ratings, burst strengths and flow capacities are identical between the two styles of brakelines.

It looks like Earls is using that spring loaded design instead of the the Teflon sleeve that Russell uses. It may be a way for Earl to retrofit their earlier design to meet DOT specs.
 

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yeah, install looks right. (not a lot you can do to install them wrong.) but those spring things are new to me. never seen em. tho i agree with how you installed them, makes sense.
 

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morefaster said:
you're at fool droop...that line is gonna be less stressed in the strut's compressed position

What are you tryijng to say that line looks to be installed correctly
 

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oh...maybe i've just heard it wrong someplace...but i'm pretty sure that 'full droop' is when the spring and strut assemby are at their most elongated and 'full compression' is when they're at their most compressed

i bet there's other, more technically accurate terms
 

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I've always heard the terms, unloaded suspension, and loaded suspension, but from that picture, as long as the line doesn't bind, and lets the suspension drop all the way without holding any of the weight, it should be fine, make sure your connections are super tight and you should be ready to go! Hope you like the setup!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well that's good to hear!

It didn't even cross my mind that it's gonna change position when I put the wheel back on and let it down off the jacks.
:noob:

I'm thinking that spring will come into play more when I drop the car.

I left it on jacks because I'm having trouble with screwing the piston back in. The other side turned with the clamp nicely and went back in, but this one refuses. I've read previous posts stating that you can get the special tool from autozone instead of getting it from Toyota. Hope it's not seized up!!!!!

Thanks everyone for your input
 

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For Earl's that is correct, I just installed a set last winter.
 

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Oops, I meant Earls, not Russels. I believe I was the first to post that I had a problem with Goodrige lines not fitting which turned out to be a bad batch about 2 years ago. They gave me Earls as a free replacement since I tried 2 sets without any luck even though the Earls was like another $60. I think I still have the old Goodrige lines, but the female connector only allows you to thread like 2 full turns of the bolt before it runs out of room.
 
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