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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
anyways i've been thinking about how to improve our strut suspension setup. most strut cars has quite a bit of SAI, im sure you guys already know the negative affect of too much SAI or use of the camber plate in the manner of stright camber or tilted for camber and caster. either of these two mentioned methods increase the SAI, and in someways affect the scrub radius to some degree. however i was wondering about using the camber plate tilted outwards and back. this would be + camber but gain caster, it would also lessen the SAI by a couple degrees. tuning camber at the knuckle.

my question is, is this worth it? or am i simply wasting my time. or would it be better to just leave all the angles as factory designed it, but instead use the camber plate as a caster plate tiling the strut fully backwards to what the plate can do.
 

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The biggest issue I see with using camber plates to reduce SAI is you are going to kill your chances of fitting a decent amount of tire under the front of the car, unless you have some pretty big front fender flares and run some really low offset wheels. Also, moving the strut top inward improves your camber curves as well. Personally I think the benefits of adding a little SAI outweigh the potential drawbacks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
so tiliting the strut inwards and backwards would be more ideal then? also adding more strut angle affects camber gain too huh, say would i affect camber gain quite a bit with an rca kit? also by adding more strut angle im under the impression it adds roll stiffness? damn suspension tuning is truely a black art, its like i understand these things to a certain degree, but have to make sure. thanks
 

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Adding strut angle raises the roll centers a little bit (same as adding roll center adjusters, just to a much lesser degree), and also improves camber curves. Roll center adjusters also improve camber curves, and by raising the roll centers make the car roll less for a given cornering load / spring rate.

If you really want to get more into this search for my threads started in this sub-forum.

Here are the main ones to get you started:
http://mr2oc.com/showthread.php?t=280503
http://mr2oc.com/showthread.php?p=2939381
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i guess its just one big comprimise, im just really trying to figure out if its worth doing this. i know that more SAI also decrease camber gain as the wheel is turning, but it is offsetted by caster as a 2:1 ratio (more or less) with caster's effect to gain camber over SAI's effect of losing camber. i guess im thinking about to many other things, at the same time i want a better camber gain curve, im also gotta measure where this would put my scrub radius, at the same time i rememer reading somthing on cround controls web sight about caster affecting weight transfer, so im trying to also think if its worth putting to much caster in only to have your tires lose maximum grip due to there being more weight now at that corner during hard cornering.

anyways ill check out those sights.
 

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There is definitely a point of diminishing return on caster, but I have found a number of cars whose stock alignment specs call for more caster than we can get even with extensive mods. For example, I believe the C5 and later Corvette is in the 7?+ degree range on caster, as is the BMW M3. Recent generations of the Porsche 911 spec 8? of caster, so I think its safe to say that, especially on a strut suspension (M3 and 911 both are struts in front), the point of diminishing returns on caster is at or above the 7-8? range.
 
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