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The clutch in on startup has been proven to wear thrust bearings on engines with marginal splash lube to them. Early 4G63s are notorious for this. I’ve seen some Honda B and D series with mondo clutches do it as well.
But I’d probably say the track usage is more a culprit given how many start cycles it saw vs track miles.
 

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Just stumbled on this on the internet. It’s a 2GRFE crank scraper. I don’t have any experience with these but the theory makes sense, less oil wrapping around the crank means more oil in the sump. Maybe a few extra hp up top as a bonus.

 

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Discussion Starter #44
Honestly not sure on the teflon vs steel. It lets it run closer to the crank which should make it more effective, but if it's worth the price difference I'm not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
The rubber pickup has the advantage of always getting right down to the bottom of the pan and absorbing all the manufacturing tolerance between all the pieces (the rubber just compresses more or less). And if there is for some reason a minor dent/ding on the pan, the pickup will adjust and be just fine.
Mine arrived yesterday, and it is exactly as you describe. The middle section is curved in a sort of bellows shape so it compresses pretty easily in the vertical direction, and the little rubber feet and the ring around the bottom are quite solid. Looks like it will be pretty easy to adapt to a pickup that will cause it to press right to the bottom of the pan so that if there is 1/4" of oil, it will get it.
 

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Do you think it’ll mate easily to the stock pickup, or you making a new pickup tube to go up to the oil pump?
 

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Also, what’s the approximate flow area between it and the stock pickup tube? Granted the stock pickup needs to be a larger area because it’ll have the pan relatively close to it restricting flow to the center.

But if it’s in the 60-75%+ the stock area, I’d say they’re roughly equivalent in flow area.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
I think I will just cut the stock pickup off and build a little cup to adapt this to the stock tube. That's how Track Group in the UK does it, and I'm not looking to reinvent the wheel here. It's 2.25" ID on the outlet side, so I even have lots of 2.25" tube scraps from building exhausts. The inlet is easily the same or larger diameter as the stock pipe. Only question would be the flow area between the rubber feet, but I am guessing it's sufficient.

 

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Yea, by inlet I was meaning the area created between the rubber feet and the bottom of the pan. It's probably fine, but I like to nerd out on stuff like that. Helps you have an idea of what something MIGHT be when you see some weird data.
 

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I would also put a gusset all the way from the support hanger, the pickup tube just below it, and the "adapter cup." Take all the bending forces off the pickup tube right below the support where all that mass is cantilevered out.

Hard to see, but this was a running change on the SR20DETs. The early pickup had a support that stopped about 1/3rd the way up the tube and it was prone to fatigue cracks forming right there due to the high number of cycles and reasonably high bending stress there. The later style put the support directly on the pickup "cup" itself so there was no fixed reaction point in the middle of the tube. Extending a gusset down and connecting all these pieces together serves a similar purpose, by increasing the second moment area of inertia enough to make bending stresses go down and also likely pushing the natural frequency of that cantilevered section up beyond the likely high part of the engine power spectral density curve.

72348
 

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Just stumbled on this on the internet. It’s a 2GRFE crank scraper. I don’t have any experience with these but the theory makes sense, less oil wrapping around the crank means more oil in the sump. Maybe a few extra hp up top as a bonus.

I bought one of these a few years ago. The long and short of it being 'don't waste your money on it'. Never fit in any way and very badly made.
 

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Their windage trays probably do help a little on a 1ZZ or 2ZZ, but the 2GR already has a windage tray covering the whole bottom of the crank if I'm not mistaken, and I'm skeptical of crank scrapers.

Back on topic though, what BMW does with the M cars is use a wet sump with scavenge pumps. You can have the sump pickup sitting on one side so you need very high Gs to starve the pickup in certain directions, and lower in other directions. Then you put a scavenge pump at the opposite end of the engine where oil pools during turning, or braking, or whatever, and have an oil line routed to the opposite side of the sump. You can use a PCV catch can as a sort of crappy air-oil separator. Since the oil isn't pressurized, the idea I had was using an electric oil pump (e.g. one for turbos) to do the job. It could run at low speed most of the time and then an accelerometer signal can have it go full speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Back on topic though, what BMW does with the M cars is use a wet sump with scavenge pumps. You can have the sump pickup sitting on one side so you need very high Gs to starve the pickup in certain directions, and lower in other directions. Then you put a scavenge pump at the opposite end of the engine where oil pools during turning, or braking, or whatever, and have an oil line routed to the opposite side of the sump. You can use a PCV catch can as a sort of crappy air-oil separator. Since the oil isn't pressurized, the idea I had was using an electric oil pump (e.g. one for turbos) to do the job. It could run at low speed most of the time and then an accelerometer signal can have it go full speed.
Interesting idea. I suppose it's reasonably safe to assume that oil is collecting in the LH portion of the upper (aluminum) oil pan, so a port on the bottom of that at the far LH edge and a pump to return it and dump it in near the pickup could be helpful.
 

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Yep, scavenge pump pickup goes on the side opposite of where the main oil pickup is, since that's the direction the engine starves of oil with the least g. With a scavenge pump, you can add baffling without worrying about oil not returning to the sump since it's being actively pumped to the sump. No effect on crankcase pressure, though you could make it pull a miniscule amount of vacuum (the crankcase would still be under positive pressure I imagine) by venting an air oil separator to the intake or atmosphere and using gravity to feed the oil back to the sump (AOS goes on the opposite side of the engine as the scavenge pump).
 
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