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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Quite a comprehensive build, lots of pics of the process - I dig it.
As far as the brake lines and that bracket. I MAY have cut my bracket with a dremel with the line in it. The metal nut provides some safety, just take it slow and it's not that bad. Or maybe I didnt, I forget now. But I def cut those things because it sucks having to bleed the lines because you did suspension work
I might have to do that, definitely don't want to have to bleed the brakes every time I want to take off the struts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Project creep is setting in, which means the engine bay needs painting, every component needs to be replaced or refinished, and every nut/bolt should be replaced.

I realized that painting the engine bay requires removing the trunk and trim around the rear window/engine bay. Plus it makes it easier to do anything really. The rear trim has bolts in the interior behind the carpet. From what I have read, you do not want to remove the rear window unless you really have to. The old sealant may really be fused to the glass, and could break it in the process of prying it off. I'll just have to make sure I do some solid taping.




Then I basically removed every component, bolt, and grommet that I could. The only things left were the wiring harness, fuse box, heater core lines, and brake lines. Also, prepping the engine bay is an absolute time sucking nightmare. No matter how much degreaser I used, every time I wiped it down the towels were still coming up black. I have no idea what product those Youtubers use to make it rinse off in one pass. I tried every degreasing product at the auto parts store and Home Depot, but the it would basically just soften the top layer of grease or it would run into the crevices.

Anyways, after a million passes with degreasing, sanding, scuffing, degreasing, etc.; I finally got the bay pretty set for primer.



If anyone can tell me what those two holes in the lower frame are for, I am all ears. I don't think they are stock, and appear to be carbon fiber held in by oval trim pieces.




I chose not to sand the seam sealer completely flat after reading that it would compromise it's original purpose (sealing out moisture and maintaining chassis rigidity). I just ground down the excess goop that was obviously not doing anything.




Once it is warm with no rain in the forecast, I'll start laying down primer.

In the meantime, I painted all of the fuel/evap hard lines (and brake booster line), ordered what replacement hoses were still available from Toyota, and obtained Wilhelm's 2GR fuel kit with regulator.

 

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Now THAT is an awesome post, Im always excited, and jealous, to see people clean up their engine bay.
What color are you going with (maybe I missed/forgot from earlier)?
Yeah, do think about a dremel tool with a cut-off wheel, just take your time and you wont nick the brake line. Then I use some zipties to keep it 'secure' in the little groove .
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Now THAT is an awesome post, Im always excited, and jealous, to see people clean up their engine bay.
What color are you going with (maybe I missed/forgot from earlier)?
Yeah, do think about a dremel tool with a cut-off wheel, just take your time and you wont nick the brake line. Then I use some zipties to keep it 'secure' in the little groove .
Not entirely sure on the color yet. Originally I thought black, but I also like the idea of using a lighter color to better identify any fluid leaks and have a contrasting background. Maybe some sort of gray.
 

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Not entirely sure on the color yet. Originally I thought black, but I also like the idea of using a lighter color to better identify any fluid leaks and have a contrasting background. Maybe some sort of gray.
Good idea on being able to see fluid leaks, that said, hopefully that wouldnt happen anyway.
The positive with a flat or matte black would be that any shiny bits, or colored parts, would be highlighted against the dark background of the engine bay
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Those holes: They had to go into the subframe when the captive nuts for the cancer bars broke off. Captive nuts all over this chassis (including the rear cross-member) are something to watch out for. It's very common for them to break off. Using anti-seize compound can help to prevent this.
Thanks, that makes complete sense now. Those bars were completely rusted, really the only component that was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Engine bay painting continued...

After more degreasing, making sure everything was scuffed and taped, I sprayed down a couple coats of Rustoleum filler primer. Once it cured, I sanded it down with #320. In hindsight, I should have spent more time on this step, laid down another coat of primer, and re-sanded EVERYTHING completely smooth. After letting my first few coats of paint cure, it was obvious that there were a number of rough/loose patches of primer left underneath, and at minimum all areas had some texture to it. I ended up having to spend a few days wet sanding the first coat of paint smooth again.

If you haven't already guessed, I have very little experience with painting and bodywork.




Much to my relief, the next few coats of paint went down smooth. Not completely perfect, but I would say it turned out ~80% of my expectations; which will have to be acceptable because I am never doing this again. Yes, I know canned spray paint will never yield the same results as a professional or even Harbor Freight paint gun.

I used Seymour EN-43 Hi-Tech Engine Spray Paint, in Ford Gray. I chose this enamel because it was heat resistant but supposedly does not contain the same ceramic as other paints which require baking to achieve a good finish. Also "disappointed" reviewers stated that it was not as glossy as they were expecting, which is exactly what I wanted. There are very few color options outside of black in "satin" finish. I initially wanted a darker gray, but again with off-the-shelf spray paints the options are limited. Overall I think I am happy with the color, it's similar to a "battleship gray." The car will also be sprayed a different color in the future, so no offense taken if you think it clashes with the red.



 

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Engine bay painting continued...

After more degreasing, making sure everything was scuffed and taped, I sprayed down a couple coats of Rustoleum filler primer. Once it cured, I sanded it down with #320. In hindsight, I should have spent more time on this step, laid down another coat of primer, and re-sanded EVERYTHING completely smooth. After letting my first few coats of paint cure, it was obvious that there were a number of rough/loose patches of primer left underneath, and at minimum all areas had some texture to it. I ended up having to spend a few days wet sanding the first coat of paint smooth again.

If you haven't already guessed, I have very little experience with painting and bodywork.





Much to my relief, the next few coats of paint went down smooth. Not completely perfect, but I would say it turned out ~80% of my expectations; which will have to be acceptable because I am never doing this again. Yes, I know canned spray paint will never yield the same results as a professional or even Harbor Freight paint gun.

I used Seymour EN-43 Hi-Tech Engine Spray Paint, in Ford Gray. I chose this enamel because it was heat resistant but supposedly does not contain the same ceramic as other paints which require baking to achieve a good finish. Also "disappointed" reviewers stated that it was not as glossy as they were expecting, which is exactly what I wanted. There are very few color options outside of black in "satin" finish. I initially wanted a darker gray, but again with off-the-shelf spray paints the options are limited. Overall I think I am happy with the color, it's similar to a "battleship gray." The car will also be sprayed a different color in the future, so no offense taken if you think it clashes with the red.



Dude, that color is great! Well done my man!




I think the MR2 produces quite a bit of heat in its poorly ventilated engine space. Using Black in my opinion would further compound the problem
Do you think that the black cars (factory) run hotter than other colors? At speed I dont think it'll matter. Actually, I dont think it'll matter much period. But Im happy to be proven wrong and learn something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
For the fuel system, I bought the Wilhelm Raceworks kit with the -6 PTFE Return line and regulator. The Wilhelm kit provides the lines and fittings, except for one that the regulator comes with. I also bought an 1/8" NPT fuel pressure gauge that attaches to the regulator. To be honest, this is my first time really working on an automotive fuel system and it was a little intimating. All of the lines and pipes coming from the fuel tank area are confusing. I took some time to consult the repair manual, online parts diagrams, and laid everything out neatly until I had a pretty good understanding.

In summary, most of the hard lines are actually for the evaporative emissions system. Below is what the 2GR fuel system will consist of. The bottom line is the feed line from the pump/tank, the middle one is the return line, and the top is the feed to the fuel rail.





Cut the barb off the stock return line, "D" in the below diagram from the repair manual.



I used the smallest rotary cutter I could find at Homedepot, and it was still a tight fit with the fuel tank filler port in the way.



I had to smooth off the end after cutting it, then popped on the Wilhelm fitting.



I couldn't get the filter orientation right without unbolting the holder and turning the filter. Then connect the OEM feed line with new crush washers.



Before:



After:



I will probably leave the charcoal canister and associated lines off for now. If I do get any excess fuel smell, I can always install it later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Remember how I whined and complained about taking off the valve covers for no reason? Well, special delivery from Kelford via Frankenstein Motorworks, 2GR camshafts just released.

I opted for the 263-EZP which do not require upgraded springs/retainers or an aftermarket ECU. I didn't want to risk stretching for the 263-A with a 50/50 chance that I would need to buy a Haltech ECU/Harness ($$$). Disregarding my prior work as a sunk cost, my logic is that I am spending an additional $1.4k (8-10% of build cost) to gain maybe 25-30 WHP (8-10% of power)? Most modifications do not come near that 1-1 cost-power ratio, especially naturally aspirated.



I am not technically inclined enough to say for certain, but these cams should be about the same or a pinch better than the MWR Stage 1 Cams (256/256 11.45mm Lift).




Back into the engine we go! I'll post a full write-up when I am done; I really could not find a comprehensive one online. The repair manual did a good job of providing relevant precautions, but in my opinion was very vague.

 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Here is a physical comparison between the stock LH exhaust CAM (top) and the Kelford 263-EZP (bottom):



Stock(left) versus Kelford (right)






The following is a brief summarization and practical application of me following the 2GRFE service manual, please do your own research before attempting. This is my first time working on internal engine components or timing, so any tips or practical expedients are welcome

Camshaft Removal:
• Remove any peripheral items (alternator, belt, brackets, etc.)
• Remove valve covers
• Remove Lower and Upper Oil Pans
• Remove Thermostat Housing
• Remove Timing Cover
• Remove Timing Gears
• Remove Bearing Caps
• Remove Camshafts
• Remove Camshaft cradle/housing

Remove the valve covers: I did this earlier when painting them, so this was breeze the second time around. Really it's just all of the bolts on the outside edge and one bolt in the middle of each cover. Just remember to remove and replace the three oil seals on each cover.

Remove the lower and upper oil pans. This must be done because the oil pickup is attached to the timing cover, as well as a stud protruding from the bottom of the cover into the upper oil pan. The hardest part is prying off the pans, a razer helps to cut the seal as you go. FYI - flip the engine over slowly while attached to a hoist or something, so it doesn't rapidly fall. Oil and coolant will come pouring out when you flip over the engine.




Remove all the components from the timing cover.

This includes:
• Thermostat Housing
• Idler Pulley
• Tensioner (several bolts from the side)
• Water pump pulley (I had to zip off with an impact gun)
• Crank Pulley (need a puller), set at TDC (0) before removing.
• Several bolts
Optional:
• Water pump
• The square timing chain tensioner cover.

Pry off timing cover:



Got sick of using plastic bags for bolt tracking, so took an idea from my son's matchbox car storage/tackle box.



Remove Timing Chain:

Set to crank to TDC. Also check the timing gear marks and align per manual (if they do not, turn the crank 360 degrees and check again). I then took a million pictures to make sure I had a solid reference when putting it back together.




To remove the chain, first remove the tensioner or follow the procedure in the manual. I could not get the tensioner lock to move, so I just removed it. Next, the manual instructs to turn the crankshaft 10 degrees counterclockwise. This loosens the chain, and you can slip it off the crank. To remove it from the cam gears, turn the B1 (RH) exhaust cam gear clockwise until it loosens. Slip off the chain and reset everything to TDC as shown above.

Remove the camshafts:

Stick a small pin into the cam gear chain tensioner, and remove the 17mm bolts while holding the camshaft with a wrench. Easier said than done, they are torqued to around 75ft lbs. I just kept the chain on the gears, one less thing to worry about later. Also remove the 12mm bolt and cam gear tensioner.



Ensure knock pins are aligned on cams, and then loosen the cam bearing caps in the order prescribed in the manual for each bank.

Bank 1 (RH):




Bank 2 (LH):



If you weren't tracking bolts before, now would be the time to do so. Reading ahead, when you replace the camshafts/housing, you only have a few minutes to do so while the new FIPG seal cures. Last thing I want to be doing is figuring out what bolt went where, or is missing.



We have camshafts!



Lastly, pry off the camshaft cradle from the heads with a taped flathead screwdriver. You are left with this, and the unpleasant realization that you have to scrap off the old FIPG without clogging the head with debris.



Kelford's mocked up in the cradle:



Will post the install once I get both sides done and back in.
 
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