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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,
I seem to remember a thread regarding adjusting the camber on the front of the car. This was achieved by elongating the holes on the wheel hubs. Can anyone enlighten me or post a link to the original thread?
 

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Two 2s - 93T, 88 SC
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The MKIs have built in camber adjusting cams on the top crash bolt front and rear. You rotote them so that the tab points down for more negative camber and straight up for more positive camber.

If you still can't get enough, I wouldn't file down the hole in the hub or strut housing - I would file down the bolt. The bolt is easier to replace if you file down too much. You can also get an eccentric bolt for the bottom to help give you more camber either way. I also heard that the crash bolts from the Spyder work in the front of the MKI, and I know from having them side by side that the MKII crash bolts work in the rear of the 87+ MKI.

John
88 SC, 93T
 

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yea, slotting holes is what cars with no adjustment built in are forced to do. I wouldnt recommend it. A car with stock springs and adjusters can get about -.6 degrees of front camber(going off memory with these #'s). With lowering springs, you can get about -1.2. If you want more than that, either get the toyota crash bolts or the eibach camber bolts. Max i've ever achieved with eibach bolts is -2.8 degrees, which i run for a couple of months. Either method should be less than 25 bucks and is better than cutting your hubs.
 

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Heys guys,

What are "crash bolts" and where are they. Pictures, pictures. Also, jts, do you have any pics of the caster adjust you mentioned in a recent post on hard steering.

Don
 

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yep, thats all it is, a thinner bolt. Swap it out for the top bolt, max out the stock adjusters, and you have some pretty decent camber. Sure is cheap compared to camber plates or adjustable arms that double wishbones have to run. Be sure to get an alignment afterwards, because the toe is now going to be off.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Guys, Thanks for the info so far - very informative.
My car is used for circuit racing only and I run a very aggressive setup. Can anyone provide me with some figures for camber, castor and toe? Thanks.
 

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My personal recommendations - and this depends on other factors like spring rates, strut valving, tire selection, and sway bar adjustment:

Front:
2.5* negative camber;
6* positive caster;
1/8" toe-in.

Rear:
2.2* negative camber;
3/16" toe-in.
 

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Two 2s - 93T, 88 SC
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For auto-x, you will want a little toe out in front. I have 3/32 total toe out in front of my 88 and it really helps the turn in.

John
88 SC, 93T
 

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If you're ONLY going to autocross it, a little toe out in the rear is good. But it is treacherous on the street or track.
 

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Two 2s - 93T, 88 SC
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EDIT : Read the darn post better, John - you said rear, Norm. Yes, rear toe out is a big no, no for street. After I installed new struts and before I got a good alignment on my 93, my rear was toed out a bit and it had 0 or positive camber on the left side and it was really uncontrollable around bends to the right. That really clued me in as to how important slight changes in alignment are for cornering.

John
88 SC, 93T
 

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Yep, we're ONLY going to autocross it...almost.

There's the drive to the track and back...*DOH*
I think we'll start with:
Front:
As much negative camber as we can squeeze out of it;
6* positive caster;
3/32" toe-out.

Rear:
As much negative camber as we can get;
1/16" toe-in
And work to progressively more aggressive settings as we learn to drive our butts off. :)
 

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jonathonbarton said:
Yep, we're ONLY going to autocross it...almost.

There's the drive to the track and back...*DOH*
I think we'll start with:
Front:
As much negative camber as we can squeeze out of it;
6* positive caster;
3/32" toe-out.

Rear:
As much negative camber as we can get;
1/16" toe-in
And work to progressively more aggressive settings as we learn to drive our butts off. :)


You have just nailed it on the head!! I would go for a ton of neg camber, and 1/16 toe in, and adjust the caster on the track. Sometimes bringing that caster negative makes it easier for me to run the zig zags easier. I try and stay near factory for starters. It is so easy to adjust the caster of the car on the ramps, that I just start a tad positive of factory spec (fogot it???), teflon right there on the rod so that I have a back to start reference, then just count the turns of the rod as it spins away form the teflon, towards neg caster. Of course, I prefer a little more oversteer than understeer, go figure. Remember to use the cheap teflon tape! Me here at G.R.P. (ghetto racing performance) believes in cutting overspending!!
 

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Fwiw, changing caster affects toe, so you might want to try at least using string or some other means to get it back to where you want it if you change your caster angle. You might be feeling the effects of toe more than the actual caster change.
 
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