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I had a blown O-ring at my AC condencer which I repaced yesterday, the system had been uncharged for nearly 3 years. I believe that was the only leak I had. The problem is the shops I have called want $30 just to pull a vaccum and tell me if there are any other leaks :bsflag:. So my new plan is to buy a retrofit kit and charge the system with 134a and record the pressures. Tomarrow I'll check the pressures again and see where I am at. Barring any leaks I will then vent the system, replace my dryer, and charge it with the ES-12a. Does this sound rational and is there anything else that I need/should do?
 

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If it was at atmospheric pressure for 3 years, you NEED to have a vacuum pulled on the system. More than leak detection, it evaporates all the moisture from the air that has infiltrated. Moisture inside an A/C sealed system is a recipe for disaster. It will freeze exiting the capillary tubes, and form an ice block. It also might not be a bad idea to replace the filter / dryer.
 

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Why use R134 to check if it holds?? Use compressed air. How much are retrofit fit kits? They can't cost much less than $30? If it holds vacuum, you will be all set for a recharge. No sense venting R134. A new drier is a good investment. I personally would not use anything but R12.
 

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Leak check

You should pressurize the system and check for leaks. If you pressurize it with dry air or similar like nitrogen you can check the pressure for leak down and /or a soapy bubble mixture applied to any joints.

If you put a refrigerant in it you can use a refrigerant leak detector to check the system (sniffer) for leaks.

As mentioned, being uncharged for 3 years will let moist air in the system and therefor a vacuum must be pulled before charging. The filter/dryer/accumulator has a material in it that absorbs moisture (desiccant) and will have soaked up the moisture of air in the system during the past 3 years. If you don't change that filter/dryer/accumulator, it will be releasing moisture into your freshly charged system.
You did say you were going to replace the filter/dryer/accumulator and I applaud you for doing it. I only explain it for others who may not know the importance of this seemingly unimportant item.
John
 

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^ thanks for the help guys; I'm just waiting on all the parts to get here. I figured that While I'm at it I might as well put in fresh oil as well, where on the compressor would I go to drain any oil left after the dryer is replaced?




*EDIT*
Sigh, didn't realize my brother had last signed in on this system.
-Kyle
 

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psycobob said:
^ thanks for the help guys; I'm just waiting on all the parts to get here. I figured that While I'm at it I might as well put in fresh oil as well, where on the compressor would I go to drain any oil left after the dryer is replaced?

-Kyle
So it's a family affair? Cool!
I am not intimate with the compressor on the MR2, Some compressors had a drain plug but most don't. You would have to remove the compressor and tilt/turn it till oil came out the hose opening. A lot of oil is trapped in the condenser and evaporator as well as the filter/dryer/accumulator and any low points in the system. To get oil out of them you must disconnect all the lines from these items and flush out the components with A/C system flush. Typically the flush is used when you have a compressor failure and the oil and system are filled with burnt oil and metal shavings. The flush also cleans up systems that were left with open lines for long periods of time and will rinse the dust, dirt and debris out. Make sure you put the recommended amount of oil back in. John
 
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