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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys. I've been making adapter PCBs for the Link plug-in Extreme ecu to adapt it to more applications than the ones currently offered by Link themselves. For example I've done Gen4 3sgte, Gen5 3sgte, and 4AGZE so far, with designs in the works for a couple of Miata applications already as well as a schematic done for putting a Link ECU into a HydraEMS case (lol). Anyway - I've been looking at doing the 2GR application as well with a plug in option and more specifically the later 2 connector versions that seem to be the most popular. I have been unable to successfully locate the OEM ecu connector for sale aftermarket, or any design information for the same. So I purchased a 2011 Sienna ECU and some desoldering equipment to explore the feasability of harvesting the OEM ecu header from the stock computer. After successfully harvesting this header I looked up the part number on TE's site (given it said TYCO on the connector) and it is a restricted connector, which means the only source would be used ecus at this point in time. The ECU cases are quite tight, but it does appear that with minor modification a plug-in ecu should be feasible to package into the factory case. The biggest issue I see with the factory case would be sending expansion and USB commuincations out - it would compromise the weather-proof-ness of the case, but most of these swaps are putting the ECU in the trunk or inside a passenger compartment I assume.

My goal with this post is to be able to gauge interest in this project and have a place to post information or ask and answer questions regarding this project.

So the Link plug-ins can do dual VVT control for intake and exhaust and up to 4 cams, DBW, CAN bus, 6 injector sequential, 6 coils, etc. no problems.

So far I've found the pinouts for the 2007 Rav4 and the 2012 Rav4 on Frankenstein Motorworks and Wilhelm Raceworks website. Are there any other variations to the pinout using the same 126 pin 2 connector ecu header?

Here's a sort of ECU header image I put together from the connector images, but reversed all the numbers and housings horizontally so they would appear as they do on the ecu side looking into the connector.

72865
 

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91 gen 4 swap, 00 stock until the K20 gets installed.
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Just checked and the 2015 Sienna ECU uses the same plugs as the 2009 Rav 4, but some of the wires are in different locations. Biggest one being that the VVT sensors are individually wired on the Rav 4, but are sort of wired together on the 2015 Sienna.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just checked and the 2015 Sienna ECU uses the same plugs as the 2009 Rav 4, but some of the wires are in different locations. Biggest one being that the VVT sensors are individually wired on the Rav 4, but are sort of wired together on the 2015 Sienna.
If you have the actual pinout for the 2015 sienna that would be helpful. Share a link if you have it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Ok so first round of progress: desoldering the 2 plug Tyco connector was successful.

2GR_ECU_Desoldered_1.JPG

I've also got a pinout for the 04-07 Rav 4 mapped to a tentative I/O on a Link Plug-in ecu with all settings set for 2GRFE.
1606964551255.png

I've got a mechanical design for the PCB done for ecu header and Link control board layout.
1606964667977.png

I've got a schematic started mapping out the ecu inputs and outputs to the 2 plug 2GR ecu header.
1606964994101.png

I have come up with a few questions and maybe someone here can answer them:

1.Does the factory mixture sensors actually output any kind of usable/tunable data on their own without some type of ecu controller, and if so, what is the scale to them? - if these work very well there may not be any need to integrate on-board dual wideband controllers as I currently have planned - though there would still be the option to wire in external standard stand alone wideband controllers in either case.

2. When these cars get swapped - how is power wired to these ecus? I assume people are just putting the factory SW20 +B and +B1 to +B and +B2 as well as IGSW and MREL? BATT to BATT, etc. The Link has the ability to control a relay specifically to power the DBW throttle body (the M+ supply power coming into the link ecu) and some of the pinouts I see have a dedicated input pin for power to the ECTS - electronically controlled throttle system.

3. Cruise control - the Link can do cruise control with DBW throttle bodies using an analog input providing various voltages for the different switch options. The wiring posted above looks like that is how the oem 2015 Sienna cruise switch is done. I'm unsure if this is how the OEM MR2 sw20 switch works, but certainly a multi-position switch with variable voltages could be made to do this as well. The nice part of this setup is it only requires one input to the ecu.

4. Is there any interest in the factory MAF sensor for the 2GR being utilized?

5. Is there any interest in any other factory narrow band o2 sensor being utilized?

Thanks for the input.
 

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1.
2.
3. I have a cruise control switch not installed in my car if you want me to test the pinouts
4. If/when I run a Link ECU with my GR swap, I plan on eliminating the MAF sensor and just running MAP.
5. I plan on a wideband o2
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
1.
2.
3. I have a cruise control switch not installed in my car if you want me to test the pinouts
4. If/when I run a Link ECU with my GR swap, I plan on eliminating the MAF sensor and just running MAP.
5. I plan on a wideband o2
Sure go ahead and test the pinouts on the cruise control and see what you can tell.
 

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1. The factory AFR sensors are kinda a "medium band" sensor (or at least that's the data that the ECU will report over OBDII). They will report actual AFR, down to about 12:1. Other than that relatively high lower limit they are basically as good as a wideband. Fine for NA applications, probably not rich enough for tuning significant amounts of boost.

2. Pretty much. Toyota hasn't changed all that much over the years in this respect, so it's pretty simple to supply power to the new ECU in pretty much the same way it was supplied to the original MR2 ECU.

3. The stock ECU cruise control inputs take a different voltage / different resistance values than the ones in the MR2 switch, but the basic function is the same. As you said, one wire input to the ECU. Again, Toyota hasn't changed this much over the years.

4. Personally I feel like at least having MAF as an option would be good. At least on the stock ECU it just plain works. Maybe it's not the best for all cases, but for most NA builds it's probably all that is needed.

5. Probably not much point in configuring an aftermarket ECU to read the post-cat narrowband sensors.

I will say, if you are buying up ECUs to salvage connectors out of, do the rest of the community a favor and stick to the ECU's that aren't already hacked by Marc, just so as not to over tax the supply. The Rav4 ECUs are kinda hard to find as is. But if I remember right there are lots of Camry 2-plug ECUs that haven't been hacked yet and so nobody is looking for them to do swaps. Probably cheaper to buy for the connectors as well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
1. The factory AFR sensors are kinda a "medium band" sensor (or at least that's the data that the ECU will report over OBDII). They will report actual AFR, down to about 12:1. Other than that relatively high lower limit they are basically as good as a wideband. Fine for NA applications, probably not rich enough for tuning significant amounts of boost.

2. Pretty much. Toyota hasn't changed all that much over the years in this respect, so it's pretty simple to supply power to the new ECU in pretty much the same way it was supplied to the original MR2 ECU.

3. The stock ECU cruise control inputs take a different voltage / different resistance values than the ones in the MR2 switch, but the basic function is the same. As you said, one wire input to the ECU. Again, Toyota hasn't changed this much over the years.

4. Personally I feel like at least having MAF as an option would be good. At least on the stock ECU it just plain works. Maybe it's not the best for all cases, but for most NA builds it's probably all that is needed.

5. Probably not much point in configuring an aftermarket ECU to read the post-cat narrowband sensors.

I will say, if you are buying up ECUs to salvage connectors out of, do the rest of the community a favor and stick to the ECU's that aren't already hacked by Marc, just so as not to over tax the supply. The Rav4 ECUs are kinda hard to find as is. But if I remember right there are lots of Camry 2-plug ECUs that haven't been hacked yet and so nobody is looking for them to do swaps. Probably cheaper to buy for the connectors as well.
When I move forward to the point of selling these, I won't be buying up anything. This will be done on a ecu by ecu basis by a customer sending in an ecu to have the connector harvested and cases modified for additional expansion connections. Currently I'm wrestling with packaging all the stuff I want inside the factory case - which is proving challenging with all options I want to include - dual onboard widebands, onboard map sensor, expansion connections for adding a flex fuel sensor, second CAN channel, and other various inputs and 1 aux output on a standard link 8 pin expansion connector. The one ecu I have bought for this project is from a 2011 Sienna.

Right now I have the electrical design including analog inputs for the factory afr sensors and the MAF so they could theoretically be used - or if not used: their inputs could be repurposed.
 

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@Loki
The output of the factory AFR sensors is on a scale of +/- a few milliamps corresponding to rich or lean at a constant voltage about 3.3V. Possibly there is a scale function for this output (just like there is one for the MAF voltage output) in the binary of the ECU but I have not looked for it. The exact range of these sensors is not known by anyone - all that is known is the range of the output on the OBD2 channel which is a synthetic number intended for compliance with the OBD2 standard. You can find details of the sensor output in the 2GR-FE repair manual. Using these sensor outputs would be very useful for NA applications and even lightly boosted applications. For example the TRD supercharger fueling is controlled via these sensors. As an aside, for some time MWR was offering for sale a two-connector patch harness that included a header on one end. This was not a de-soldered header. I don't know where they sourced it, you might inquire - most likely it came from Boomslang.
 

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That's awesome, any plans for the 3rd gen Sienna pinout? also what would it take to talk you into a 2AR version (same connector and case)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I have a local guy with the 04-07 Rav pinout now I hope to be able to use to test. If it works out ok I will move forward with the later pinout(s) next. If I can get pinout information on any ecu sharing this same header and basic mechanical config going foward then it shouldn't be a problem to do anything similar.

I know this first version already will need some changes to the design as I forgot to add pull up resistors for the cam sensor inputs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I compared this pinout to the 2012 Rav pinout and it's functionally the same or could use the same pinout on an EMS header. The differences are a CANH/L on B1 and B24 with this 2015 Sienna, and the ground and power for the VVT sensors are shared from one pin each to the ECU versus the 2012 Rav pinout that has individual power/grounds for each VVT sensor direct from the ecu. The pins listed as CANH/L for OBD2 Connector on the 2012 Rav pinout according to the spread sheet by Wilhelm go to the body module on the 2015 pinout - and there is nothing listed on pins B1 and B24 in the Wilhelm worksheet.

Regardless, the pinouts are similar enough that a single adapter board should work for either one. I am assuming that the 2015 pinout pictured above is the Gen3 Sienna pinout?
 

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Yes, the 2012 rav4 and 3rd gen sienna pinouts are compatible. But i thought you were targeting the '07 rav4 first?

If you're targeting the 2012 rav4 you probably want to sell it as the "3rd gen sienna" pinout. that's what everyone knows that pinout as for now. Otherwise you'll get people with earlier rav4 harnesses buying and complaining.
 
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